Posted in baraka, creativity, quilting

Baby Quilt 2014 Challenge

This is going to be fun!

Please scroll down below Paddington.  It’s a scan and I should’ve cropped it.  Lesson learned!

river011Our Guild’s Baby Quilts Committee have come up with a brilliant challenge for the quilt show next year.

Everyone who accepts the challenge receives – free – a packet.  All the packets are different but they all contain nine 6-inch squares (Paddington is one of them) plus a fat quarter in solid or tone-on-tone green or yellow.

Fabric from the nine squares and the fat quarter have to be included in the quilt top.

Additionally each packet contains some extra scraps that could be used along with whatever we have in our stash.

What I appreciate about this challenge:

  • Not too many sadistic rules so hopefully lots of members will feel moved to participate
  • Free is always good — they are even providing the batting once the top is completed.  Free is good because no one has to think about the money before joining in AND once people have signed up almost everyone will actually finish and turn in a baby quilt for the local neonatal intensive care unit.
  • The fabrics in the packet are pretty eclectic so even more scraps from the stash can come in
  • Having all different fat quarters is great
  • The use of yellow or green for the fat quarter is gender neutral

Of course it’s a challenge so the design has to be kept secret until next March.

But I’ll write process notes as I go along and then publish them after the deadline.

Put a marmalade sandwich in your hat (like Paddington) and Stay Tuned!

Posted in baraka, Environment, Rant

Quilt Without Guilt

Did you know that fibre can be kept out of the landfill?

Sure you probably send your gently used clothing to the thrift store where someone else can enjoy it affordably.

But what about the other stuff?  The baby bibs with ground in mashed carrots, the dress shirt with the leaky ballpoint on the pocket, the ragged bath towels, the teeny-tiny scraps of quilting fabric, the little bits of batting we all have?

These can all be recycled and come back to life in various forms, such as industrial wiping rags and mixed fibre filling for pillows.

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These two bags represent a few weeks of sewing snippets.  With my determination to get my scraps under control, I gathered these up along with some gently used wearables and knick knacks and we headed to WIN, Women In Need, a local Victoria organization that operates a thrift store, recycling clothes, housewares and furniture.  They are able to accept CLEAN mixed fibres such as these offcuts and sell them to companies that recycle them.

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Here’s a shot of their parking lot.

This is worth checking out — please make sure that the charity you plan to help can in fact accept textiles for recycling.  One of Oxfam’s biggest expenses is paying to get rid of the stuff people donate that the charity can’t use, and I believe Goodwill has a similar issue.  Also, if it’s old clothing you would wash it first of course!

What’s your best tip for keeping stuff out of the landfill?  Please share!

Posted in baraka, productivity, quilting, stash

Use What You Have – Got Stash??

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well, this is embarrassing!  I knew I had a lot of scraps — defined below — because I had a large tote bag stuffed full, plus some that overflowed onto the floor, plus an open medium size moving box that the tote bag sat in also containing scraps.

Making slabs to recover southern Alberta  inspired me to tidy and organize them.   I emptied the bin in the photo above by consolidating some dyeing fabric and blank white garments which easily fit into a single bin, then started folding and laying scraps in.  Now the tote bag is empty and the box is nearly but not quite empty.

What an eyeopener!  This is the wake up call.  I could make a slab a day for the rest of my life just out of this bin.

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and the slabs would be colour coordinated too!

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NOT in the bin:

  • batiks for the prairie points on the dino quilt that coordinates with this pillowcase.
  • solid fabrics except for very small scraps
  • green and pink prints for baby quilts

The bin is on a shelf at waist height where I will see it and be able to reach it easily.

Of course, tidying one thing led to another and I have plenty of batting too, now consolidated into a Rubbermaid roughneck tote bin and a moving box.  And there is a little more floor space free than before.

Does anyone else have this problem?  What are you doing about it?

The bin there bin really is just that.  It seems that there are very few fabrics which I’ve completely used up.

This represents 15 years of quilting but I can see the next 15 years are already right here!  And in the very first class the teachers warned us about this, but who listened, LOL?

DEFINITION OF A SCRAP

Minimum:

  • at least two inches square OR
  • one and half inches by six inches long

Maximum:

  • fat quarter with a chunk cut out of it, because of the number of times when I’ve been preparing for a workshop that calls for fat quarters only to discover the dreaded missing corners!
  • quarter yard or just over and NOT width of fabric