Posted in creativity, quilting, stash, surface design

Improvised piece

Inspired by Rayna Gillman’s book Create your own free-form quilts: a stress-free journey to original design

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What’s great about this book is that the author is into surface design as well as quilting and so has suggestions for the questions that plague me:

  • What to do with the ugly commercial fabrics?
  • What to do with the muddy/unfortunate/bizarre results of dyeing and surface design experiments?
  • What to do with the amazing fabric that is just too lovely to cut?  Sometimes this comes from a store and sometimes it’s the result of good things happening in the dye tub

Our guild is blessed with an extensive library and resource centre, where I found this book.  After reading it several times I really REALLY  wanted to experiment with the method, but given the other projects I have on the go, I had an argument with myself.  I won and the left-brained disciplinarian lost (as usual).

This piece measures 10-1/2 by 26 inches and contains

  • ugly commercial fabric (the brown and green print)
  • less successful surface design (the navy horizontal strips)
  • amazing pink and green deconstructed screen printing (in the vertical strips that are woven through from top to bottom, towards the middle)

Lessons learned:

  • It’s good to just play from time to time without having a precise vision in mind
  • Letting go of all the design rules about coordinating colours and how to choose fabrics can be a big challenge
  • This method is very conducive to Working In A Series because there is just so much to explore.  There will be more of these!

In honour of having taken the process pledge, here are some process pix:

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This is the navy (see why it was a problem child?) with yellow print attached to two of the strips.

 

photo(67)Here’s the strata that ended up being sliced between the horizontal areas.  This shows much more clearly the beautiful pink and green deconstructed screen print.  The pale green fan print is one I’ve used in many different pieces, although I’m not really a fan of 30’s reproductions, which is what this looks like.  But I love being able to mix up such disparate fabrics as these, the green and black batik and the green and pink/purple/burgundy stripe at the top.

Posted in quilting, stash

Slab Baby Quilts

I had so much fun making slabs to help recover Southern Alberta that after I had mailed off the last package (the organizers had a deadline of July 30) I tweaked the concept and have started making baby quilts.

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Unfortunately this is the only photo I have of the first one because I was rushing to finish the top before our Guild meeting.  Anyhoo, the blocks are made just 9-1/2 inches to finish at 9 inches and I am putting 12 blocks in three rows of four and then adding a contrasting border to frame it.  The blue quilt has a rust red tonal border.

Thanks to Laine who contributed one large green block.  I trimmed into four baby size blocks, adding white and other green fabric as necessary.

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Lessons learned:

  • Pale pastels and airy scattered prints, a.k.a. low volume, are good
  • Easier to sew together if there are not too many seams on the outside of the top, especially on the corners!
  • Trimming to size is easier if smaller scraps are inside the block and wider ones on the edges

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  • I cut a 9-1/2 inch square out of heavy sketching paper as a template so it’s easy to tell how much more needs to be added to the block while you’re assembling it

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  • finished blocks have their own home.  This is supposed to be for scrapbooking paper, don’t tell the scrapbooking police!  although you could use a pizza box.  We often make our own and rarely phone for pizza so we don’t have a source for clean pizza boxes. The template lives in the box and often has a sticky note on it with notes like “need 3 more blue blocks”